Tag Archive: folklore

The Wreck of the Isadore Behind Cape Neddick Island, by Nubble light

Al Wood | November 11, 2017 | COMMENTS:Comments Closed
Storm clouds over Nubble lighthouse a few miles from the New Hampshire border.

Storm clouds over Nubble lighthouse as it sits a few hundred feet from the mainland rocky shore.

The Wreck of Isadore: One of the Catalysts for the Construction of Cape Neddick Lighthouse

Cape Neddick lighthouse is one of the most photographed beacons in the nation. Located in York, Maine, near the New Hampshire and Maine border, it is also known as “Nubble Light,” it sits atop a small rock island called a “nubble”, located a few hundred feet from shore. Due to the rocky coastal area, a lighthouse was requested from many local mariners since the early 1800s. In 1837 a proposal was rejected sighting there were “already enough lighthouses in the area.” A lighthouse was finally erected over 35 years later after the famous wreck of the Isadore in 1842. The Isadore sank during a fierce gale storm on a Thanksgiving night in 1842, killing all aboard. Mariners over the years still claim to see the ghost ship patrolling the area where it had perished on quiet nights.

The true story of the Isadore’s tragedy begins a couple of nights before it set sail with a load of cargo from Kennebunkport, Maine. One of the Isadore’s crewmen, Thomas King, dreamed about the wreckage of a ship resembling the Isadore and its crew washed up on the shoreline. He told the dream to the Captain of the ship, Leander Foss, and begged to be left ashore, but the captain threatened that he had better be on board when the ship left or face serious consequences, especially where the crew member was already paid a month’s wages in advance for their trip to New Orleans.

Winter Seacoast Sunset

The night before the Isadore sailed, another crewman dreamed about seven coffins, with his own body in one of them. He also came to Captain Foss about his dream, and also begged not to have the ship sail the next evening fearing for the lives of all aboard, but Foss refused to listen. The frightened crewmember and King both discussed their dreams with one another fueling King’s decision to stay behind.

On Thanksgiving night in 1842, the call went out for all crew to make ready for sail. Thomas King stayed away, deserting his post on the ship, and hid in town fearing the wrath of the captain, and of the fate of the ship. The Isadore sailed out of Kennebunkport with a load of lumber, bound for New Orleans. As it was leaving port, the wind picked up out of the northeast, and snow began to fall. By the time the crew had come around Boon Island Lighthouse, about seven miles away from Kennebunkport, the storm had intensified to gale force winds. The sea was making over twenty foot swells in blinding snow tossing the ship closer towards Avery’s Cove near the Cape Neddeck island, where it crashed on the rocks and sank.

The wreckage of the ship was discovered the next morning all around Cape Neddick Island, separated by a few hundred feet of ocean water from the main shoreline and six miles from Boon Island. The bodies of seven crewmen out of 14 aboard were the only ones found washed ashore. One of the bodies was the other crewman who had dreamed about the seven coffins and was too frightened of the wrath of the captain to remain ashore. The body of Captain Ross was never found.

Sightings of the Ghost Ship Isadore

The Isadore still seems to appear as a phantom ship patrolling the bays. Since the day it perished in 1842, there have been sporadic sightings by mariners and visitors just offshore of Boon Island and Avery’s Cove. Over the years, many fishermen have claimed to have seen it and have tried to approach the ship, but it always seems to disappear when they sail near the site. Over the years, hotel guests and tourists residing along the shoreline inns in York, near the site of the wreck, have reported seeing a faint phantom ship, even though most do not even know the story about the tragedy of the Isadore.

 

New England Lighthouses

Nubble (Cape Neddick) lighthouse lit up for the holiday season.

Lighting of the Nubble During the Holiday Season

Cape Neddick lighthouse, or Nubble light, is well celebrated as a photographer’s favorite lighthouse to photography. Here are a few images of Nubble lighthouse I took over the years. During the holiday season visitors will find a ceremony that occurs around the weekend after Thanksgiving as the “Lighting of the Nubble” where the beacon is decorated and lit each night during the holiday season. In the first week of December, visitors can also enjoy the Festival of Lights parade, among other events put on by the York Parks and Recreation. By the lighthouse, you’ll also find a lighted lobster trap holiday tree, a New England tradition in many seacoast towns. For those who can’t visit during this time of year, there is also the same lighting festivities in July, which is a grand site during much warmer weather of course. Check out this photographic icon, and maybe you might catch a glimpse of the ghost ship Isadore.

Happy holidays and have a safe, joyous, season.

Enjoy!

Allan Wood

 

Book - Lighthouses and Attractions in Southern New England

Book – Lighthouses and Coastal Attractions in Southern New England: Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts

 

 

My 300-page book, Lighthouses and Coastal Attractions of Southern New England: Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts, provides special human interest stories from each of the 92 lighthouses, along with plenty of indoor and outdoor coastal attractions you can explore. These include whale watching excursions, lighthouse tours, windjammer sailing tours and adventures, special parks and museums, and lighthouses you can stay overnight. You’ll also find plenty of stories of haunted lighthouses. Lighthouses and their nearby attractions are divided into regions for all you weekly and weekend explorers.

 

 

 

 

 

Book - Lighthouses and Coastal Attractions in Northern New England: New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont

Book – Lighthouses and Coastal Attractions in Northern New England: New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont

 

My 300-page book, Lighthouses and Coastal Attractions of Northern New England: New Hampshire, Maine, and Vermont, provides special human interest stories from each of the 76 lighthouses, along with plenty of indoor and outdoor coastal attractions you can explore, and tours. Lighthouses and their nearby attractions are divided into regions for all you weekly and weekend explorers. Attractions and tours also include whale watching tours, lighthouse tours, windjammer sailing tours and adventures, special parks and museums, and lighthouses you can stay overnight. There are also stories of haunted lighthouses in these regions, like Cape Neddick lighthouse.

 

 

 

 

 

Book of lighthouse stories

Book- New England Lighthouses: Famous Shipwrecks, Rescues, and Other Tales

 

My Book, New England Lighthouses: Famous Shipwrecks, Rescues, and Other Tales. Provides lots of detailed stories of famous incidents and folklore that occurred near the beacons of the New England coast, like the story mentioned about the wreck of the Isadore. The book also contains, along with my photographs, vintage images provided by the Coast Guard and various organizations, and paintings by six famous artists of the Coast Guard.

 

 

 

 

 

American Lighthouse Foundation

American Lighthouse Foundation

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